Science of dating trees

13-Aug-2019 10:18

Archaeologists sometimes study the ring patterns in beams or other pieces of wood from archaeological sites to help date the sites; they may also study the ring patterns to infer the local climatic history.

Similarly, pollen grains released by seed-bearing plants became fossilized in rock layers.

Compare the timeline you recorded to the one shown here. Consider another situation: What if you found a sample of wood and constructed a skeleton plot for it, but it did not match any patterns on the master chronology?

If necessary, go back to Step 8 and realign the patterns to see how this master chronology was constructed.

Visible rings result from the change in growth speed through the seasons of the year, thus, one ring usually marks the passage of one year in the life of the tree.

The rings are more visible in temperate zones, where the seasons differ more markedly.

Similarly, pollen grains released by seed-bearing plants became fossilized in rock layers.

Compare the timeline you recorded to the one shown here. Consider another situation: What if you found a sample of wood and constructed a skeleton plot for it, but it did not match any patterns on the master chronology?

If necessary, go back to Step 8 and realign the patterns to see how this master chronology was constructed.

Visible rings result from the change in growth speed through the seasons of the year, thus, one ring usually marks the passage of one year in the life of the tree.

The rings are more visible in temperate zones, where the seasons differ more markedly.

Relative dating methods are used to determine only if one sample is older or younger than another.