Dating exodus

08-Dec-2019 09:01

Merneptah was the son of Rameses II, and his stela records his victory over the Canaanites and Syrians (1212-1209 BC).

RESPONSE: First, “Raamses” and “Ramesses” are not identical names, so we shouldn’t be certain that this is describing the same person.

The unnamed Pharaoh said, “They will multiply and in the event of war, they will also join themselves to those who hate us, and fight against us and depart from the land” (Ex. The Hyksos feared that the native Egyptians would take back over, and they were worried that the Hebrews would ally with them.

Let’s consider a number of claims from the advocates of the late date.

The new methods of historical investigation forced Scripture to be viewed from both of those perspectives.Dennis Bratcher Fixing the date of the exodus has proven to be one of those contentious areas of biblical study that has produced two opposing views.As with many biblical historical issues, the two views are more a clash of how people view Scripture and differing methods of study based on those views than they are a result of conflicting interpretation of the historical evidence.The 15th century model, on the other hand, has not been given adequate consideration because of the perceived disparity between archaeological finds and the Biblical narrative at Jericho and Ai, which I have addressed elsewhere. USE OF THE NAME RAMESES IN EXOD Hoffmeier refers to Exod as “a foundational text” as, indeed, the 13th-century model hangs on this one verse of the Hebrew Bible.The mention of the Israelites building the city of Rameses places the exodus in the 13th century and makes Rameses II the most likely candidate for the Pharaoh of the exodus according to the adherents of this model.

The new methods of historical investigation forced Scripture to be viewed from both of those perspectives.

Dennis Bratcher Fixing the date of the exodus has proven to be one of those contentious areas of biblical study that has produced two opposing views.

As with many biblical historical issues, the two views are more a clash of how people view Scripture and differing methods of study based on those views than they are a result of conflicting interpretation of the historical evidence.

The 15th century model, on the other hand, has not been given adequate consideration because of the perceived disparity between archaeological finds and the Biblical narrative at Jericho and Ai, which I have addressed elsewhere. USE OF THE NAME RAMESES IN EXOD Hoffmeier refers to Exod as “a foundational text” as, indeed, the 13th-century model hangs on this one verse of the Hebrew Bible.

The mention of the Israelites building the city of Rameses places the exodus in the 13th century and makes Rameses II the most likely candidate for the Pharaoh of the exodus according to the adherents of this model.

It clearly specifies a period of 450 years after the period of wilderness wandering and before the time of Samuel.